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Posts for: October, 2017

By Elite Women's Health
October 13, 2017
Category: Sexual Health
Tags: Sex   Intercourse   Period  

While your period may put a damper on some of your activities it doesn’t have to get in the way of everything. OB-GYNs often hear women asking whether it’s okay toSex, Intercourse, Period have sex while on their period. The simple answer is that sex is completely fine during this time of the month. Of course, there is a lot more that goes into it. Find out everything you need to know about having sex while on your period to decide whether this is the right decision for you.

The first thing to consider is how comfortable you feel with having sex while on your period. It’s completely natural and completely safe, but some women are concerned that they might feel a bit self-conscious or that they may ruin the sheets. If you are concerned about getting blood on your bedding, you can always place a towel down, or opt for another location such as the shower that won’t have you worried that you may have to throw out your nice new sheets.

One benefit to having sex while on your period is that menstruation can often act as a lubricant, which can make the act more pleasurable for everyone. Plus, with the elevation of hormones such as estrogen and testosterone, you may find yourself more sexually charged and more easily aroused, which can be a major plus. If you also find that you easily experience dryness during sex then having sex while on your period may actually improve the situation. It’s even believed that orgasms can help with menstrual cramps.

Of course, there are two other things to consider before you get down to business. The first thing you’ll want to do is discuss this with your partner to make sure that everyone is comfortable with the idea of having sex while on your period. By making sure that your partner is completely comfortable with the situation you negate any negative thoughts or concerns you may have during sex.

The second thing to consider is that many women hear that they can’t get pregnant during their period so they opt to have sex without a condom. It’s important that you talk to your gynecologist about the risks involved in not using a condom. Besides the risk of contracting STDs, there is also still a possibility that you could get pregnant. For some women, their ovulation overlaps with their menstruation. If you aren’t taking birth control then you’ll want to wear protection even during this time of the month.

If you have questions about your sexual health, menstruation or other women’s health issues, your OBGYN is here to help. There is no question too embarrassing or awkward. We are here to make sure you get the answers you need to lead a healthy life.


By Elite Women's Health
October 02, 2017
Category: Sexual Health
Tags: Cervicitis  

Have you been diagnosed with cervicitis? If so, chances are pretty good that you have questions about this condition. This condition, which causesCervicitis inflammation of the cervix, is surprisingly common. There are many reasons why someone might develop cervicitis:

 

  • A sexually transmitted disease (e.g. gonorrhea; genital herpes)
  • Allergies (e.g. latex)
  • Injury to the cervix
  • Irritation (e.g. from diaphragm)
  • A bacterial or hormonal imbalance
  • Cancer (Rare)

Some women may have cervicitis but never even know that they have it. Some women with cervicitis may experience abdominal pain, yellow or gray discharge, vaginal itching and bleeding, painful urination or pain during sex.

 

What puts you at risk for cervicitis? While any woman can develop this condition you are more at risk for developing this inflammatory problem if you have multiple sexual partners, have sex without a condom or if you’ve had cervicitis in the past.

 

A simple swab test of the cervix is often all that’s needed to diagnose this problem. If you’ve been diagnosed with cervicitis, or if you suspect that you might have it, this is something that needs to be treated right away. Cervicitis can actually spread to other areas such as the fallopian tubes or uterus.

 

Cervicitis will often get worse if left untreated and can lead to other more serious complications such as infertility and pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). If you are pregnant, this condition could also put your unborn baby at risk. This is why it’s so important that you visit your OBGYN if you notice any symptoms or changes in your vaginal health that have you concerned.

 

Luckily, cervicitis can easily be treated with antibiotics such as doxycycline or azithromycin. Before medication is prescribed your OBGYN will also test for any sexually transmitted infections that may be causing this infection. If a sexually transmitted disease is also detected then we will need to treat that infection accordingly with further medication.

 

If you are pregnant, doxycycline will not be prescribed. In this situation, you will most likely be prescribed azithromycin or a cephalosporin. Again, the medicine your gynecologist decides to prescribe will be based on the cause of your cervicitis.

 

If in doubt, turn to your OBGYN to address all of your questions and concerns regarding cervicitis or the symptoms you are experiencing.